Weather Facts

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 104.7 km² (40.4 mi²). 82.4 km² (31.8 mi²) of it is land and 22.2 km² (8.6 mi²) of it (21.25%) is water.

Average Annual Air Temperatures

  • 73.9F average annual temperature
  • 83.8F average annual high temperature
  • 63.9F average annual low temperature

Average Annual Water Temperatures

  • 77.5F Average annual temperature
  • 70.8F average fall/winter temperature
  • 84.1F average spring/summer temperature
  • 66.0F average winter low temperature
  • 87.0F average summer high temperature

General Weather Information


Aviation Weather


Hurricane Information

Hurricanes

A hurricane is a severe tropical storm that forms in the North Atlantic Ocean, the Northeast Pacific Ocean east of the dateline, or the South Pacific Ocean east of 160E. Hurricanes need warm tropical oceans, moisture and light winds above them. If the right conditions last long enough, a hurricane can produce violent winds, incredible waves, torrential rains and floods. In other regions of the world, these types of storms have different names.

Hurricanes rotate in a counterclockwise direction around an "eye." A tropical storm becomes a hurricane when winds reach 74 mph. There are on average six Atlantic hurricanes each year; over a three-year period, approximately five hurricanes strike the United States coastline from Texas to Maine. The Atlantic hurricane season begins June 1 and ends November 30. The East Pacific hurricane season runs from May 15 through November 30, with peak activity occurring during July through September.

When hurricanes move onto land, the heavy rain, strong winds and heavy waves can damage buildings, trees and cars. The heavy waves are called a storm surge. Storm surge is very dangerous and a major reason why you MUST stay away from the ocean during a hurricane.
http://hurricanes.noaa.gov/

Know the Terms

Familiarize yourself with these terms to help identify a hurricane hazard:

Tropical Depression: An organized system of clouds and thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 38 MPH (33 knots) or less. Sustained winds are defined as one-minute average wind measured at about 33 ft (10 meters) above the surface.

Tropical Storm: An organized system of strong thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 39–73 MPH (34–63 knots).

Hurricane: An intense tropical weather system of strong thunderstorms with a well-defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 MPH (64 knots) or higher.

Storm Surge: A dome of water pushed onshore by hurricane and tropical storm winds. Storm surges can reach 25 feet high and be 50–1000 miles wide.

Storm Tide: A combination of storm surge and the normal tide (i.e., a 15-foot storm surge combined with a 2-foot normal high tide over the mean sea level created a 17-foot storm tide).

Hurricane/Tropical Storm Watch: Hurricane/tropical storm conditions are possible in the specified area, usually within 36 hours. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information.

Hurricane/Tropical Storm Warning: Hurricane/tropical storm conditions are expected in the specified area, usually within 24 hours.

Short Term Watches and Warnings: These warnings provide detailed information about specific hurricane threats, such as flash floods and tornadoes.

For More Information

If you require more information about any of these topics, the following are resources that may be helpful.

FEMA Publications
Against the Wind: Protecting Your Home from Hurricane and Wind Damage. FEMA-247. A guide to hurricane preparedness.
Community Hurricane Preparedness. IS-324. CD-ROM or Web-based training course for federal, state, and local emergency managers.
Safety Tips for Hurricanes. L 105. Publication for teachers and parents for presentation to children. To order, call 1 (800) 480-2520.

Other Publications
Protect Your Home against Hurricane Damage, Institute for Business and Home Safety. 110 William Street, New York, NY 20038
http://www.fema.gov/areyouready/hurricanes.shtm